City of Duluth remembers 9/11

Members of the 148th Fighter Wing stand during a prayer sung by a rabbi during the 9/11 tribute held at the DECC in Duluth, Minn., Sept. 11, 2011.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Scott G. Herrington)

Members of the 148th Fighter Wing stand during a prayer sung by a rabbi during the 9/11 tribute held at the DECC in Duluth, Minn., Sept. 11, 2011. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Scott G. Herrington)

Duluth Mayor Don Ness speaks about peace and understanding during the 9/11 tribute held at the DECC in Duluth, Minn., September 11, 2011.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Scott G. Herrington)

Duluth Mayor Don Ness speaks about peace and understanding during the 9/11 tribute held at the DECC in Duluth, Minn., Sept. 11, 2011. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Scott G. Herrington)

DULUTH, Minn. -- "No day in history invokes such vivid imagery," said Duluth Mayor Don Ness, the keynote speaker at the 10th anniversary observance of 9/11 held at the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center (DECC) in Duluth Sept. 11, 2011.

The Duluth 9/11 Tribute Committee hosted the free, hour long event in remembrance of the lives lost, and in honor of the military, police, firefighters, EMTs, Community Watch volunteers and others who protect the community. People from around the northland attended--among them were service members, local law enforcement, first responders and members of various faiths and ethnicities.

Speakers from the Christian, Muslim, and Jewish faiths spoke about understanding, forgiveness, and peace despite the differences in their beliefs. A commonality among all those that spoke was the importance and respect for human life--something all the speakers touched on.

In addition to the religious leaders, a member of the Red Cross spoke of her time working at ground zero after the attacks.

Members of the 148th Fighter Wing were also in attendance, taking part in observing the emotion-filled tribute.

Lt. Col. Timothy D. Martenson, a 148th Fighter Wing chaplain at the tribute, said that "the event was a good opportunity to see the community come together and remember the events of 9/11 with a different emphasis--one of compassion."

"We are a city that values peace," said Mayor Ness. "The concept of peace should be universal."